1840-1849 timeline for Orford township

This page is a work-in-progress.

c.1840 – The vicinity of Muir Kirk received its first settlers, including John and Duncan Gillis, Thomas Simpson, David Ford, Thomas English, and William Curtis. [1]

1841 – David H. Gesner was elected District Councillor and succeeded in the Clerkship of Orford by Archibald Walker. [1]

1841-12-28 – By proclamation of government, the village of Antrim, in the Western District (not Howard township), was declared “a Port of Entry anc Clearance for the Entry of Goods brought or imported into this Province from any adjoining Foreign Country … that there be included within the limits of the said Port of Antrim, the Townships of Orford, Howard, Harwich, and the front Concession of Raleigh.” [2]

1843 – Archibald Walker was succeeded in the Clerkship by Peter Lampman. [1]

1844-09-26 – The Hon. S.B. Harrison was elected to represent Kent County by a majority of 135 votes over Joseph Woods, Esq. David H. Gesner was the Returning Officer and G. Duck, the Poll Clerk, for Orford township. [3]

1844-11-27 – The port of Rond Eau [Rondeau] replaced Antrim as the port of entry and clearance for the townships of Orford, Howard, Harwich, and the front concession of Raleigh. [4]

1845 – David H. Gesner was reinstalled as Clerk of the township, holding this office until 1853. [1]

1845-02-06 – The Hon. S.B. Harrison having resigned his seat, the representation of Kent was voted again. The County of Kent poll returned Joseph Woods, Esq., as the winner over the Hon. H.J. Boulton, by a majority of 95 votes. The township of Orford voted in favour of Mr. Woods by a margin of 36 votes to 10. [5]

1845-05-08 – A severe frost did “considerable injury both to the grain and fruit trees; on the plains and in other exposed situations, many crops have been cut off.” [6]

1846 – Number of acres taken up, 16,625; under cultivation, 3,281; value of rateable property, $38,836. Population, 1000. [7]

1846-02-21 – At a meeting of the Harwich, Howard, and Orford Branch Agricultural Society, the following officers were elected: Benjamin Bell, Esq., president; George Young, treasurer; Oliver Stewart, Andrew Gesslie, Jacob Shepley, Peter Walker, John Steward, sen. and Alexander McKay, directors. [8]

1846-03-14 – At a meeting of the directors of the Harwich, Howard, and Orford Branch Agricultural Society, the directors fixed the award of premiums for the ensuing season. [8]

1846-05-12 – At the meeting of the Municipal Council for the Western District, Mr. Henry submitted a “petition from Orford for the establishment of parts of two roads in that township; also [a] petition from certain inhabitants to be allowed the appropriation of of [sic] their school taxes to a school in the eastern part of the township. Next day, “Mr. Henry presented the petition of certain inhabitants of Orford, for the establishment of a road laid out on the lands of Finlay McKerragher, and on lot No. 13, in said township. [The matter was r]eferred to committee on roads. Also the petition of certain inhabitants praying the appropriation of a school in the eastern part of said township [was] referred to committee on schools.” In the Report of the Committee on Roads and Bridges, delivered in Council on the 13th May, the petition of Finlay of McKereagher [sic] was granted. [9]

1846-10-09 – At a meeting of the Municipal Council, Western District, Mr. Henry cited a Memorial of certain inhabitants of Orford, connected with a School in the eastern part of the Township. [10] (Transcriber’s note: Nothing seems to have come out of this petition at this date.)

1849-06-05 – After a mob attacked and set fire to the parliament buildings in Montréal, the inhabitants of Orford presented an address to His Excellency the Right Hon. James, Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, and Governor-General of British North America, expressive of their outrage “at the insult offered to the Sovereignty of our beloved Queen, in Your Excellency’s person, and our abhorrence at the cowardly and malign act of setting fire to the House of Parliament.” [11]


Sources:

1.

Phelps, Edward, and Ross Cumming, eds. “Township of Orford.” Illustrated Historical Atlas of the Counties of Essex and Kent, 1880-1. Toronto: H. Beldon & Company, 1886.

2.

Province of Canada. Canada Gazette, 1 January 1842. No. 14 (pg. 193). Digital image online at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/canada-gazette/ (accessed 2018-03-15).

3.

Chatham Gleaner, 19 October 1844 (pg. 2). “Election of Kent.” Digital image online at news.google.ca (accessed and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2018-03-16).

4.

Province of Canada. Canada Gazette, 30 November 1844, No. 166 (pg. 1564). Digital image online at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/canada-gazette/ (accessed 2018-03-15).

5.

Chatham Gleaner, 4 February 1845 (pg. 2). “Kent Election—The Conservative Cause Triumphant.” Digital image online at news.google.ca (accessed and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2018-03-16).

6.

Chatham Gleaner, 13 May 1845 (pg. 3). Severe frost in the district with damage to crops. Digital image online at news.google.ca (accessed and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2018-03-16).

7.

Sutherland, R.R., compiler. County of Kent Gazetteer, and General Business Directory, for 1864-5. Ingersoll, Canada West: A.R. & John Sutherland, 1864.

8.

Chatham Gleaner, 6 April 1846. Letter to the Editor re: the Harwich, Howard, and Orford Branch Agricultural Society. Digital image online at newspapers.com (accessed 2018-03-18).

9.

Chatham Gleaner, 19 & 26 May and 2 June 1846 editions. Reports on the Eighteenth Session of the Municipal Council of the Western District.

10.

Chatham Gleaner, 27 October 1846 (No. 13). “Minutes of the Western District Council,” pp. 1-2.

11.

Province of Canada. Canada Gazette, 5 June 1849, No. 408 (Supplement; pg. 6635). Digital image online at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/canada-gazette/ (accessed and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2018-03-15).

❖     ❖     ❖

© Alison Kilpatrick 2018